Policy

Policy

Policy Faculty

Professor
Assistant Professor
Assistant Professor
Assistant Professor

Policy Courses

Course Number: HUL 372 | Credits: 3
Course Objective:

The course will use interdisciplinary texts to give students a historical overview of agrarian India starting from the colonial period, plantation and export economies, recurring famines, community development programs and land reforms after independence, the green revolution, and the neglect of rainfed / dryland regions. It will explore various dimensions of development in agriculture including the advent of the agricultural sciences and the birth of the agricultural extension system. The myth of the ignorant farmer and the self-sufficient village will be discussed. Case studies on the historical roots of globalization and agricultural commodity chains related to new technologies, and the linkages between the market and the state in contemporary agriculture will be discussed. The growing social and geographical disparity with ecological distress and the threat of climate change, farmer suicides, and debt spirals on the one hand, and a risky but rewarding cash crop economy on the other, will also be explored. Finally the course will discuss aspirations of rural youth, opportunities for livelihoods, and gender and caste dimensions of the growing urbanization of rural centres.

Course Number: HUL 845 | Credits: 3
Course Objective:

To acquaint the student with (a) philosophical concepts underlying thinking about the environmental crisis and (b) the models of human-nature relationship found in some of the classical philosophical systems of India. Contents: (a) What is 'environment'? (b) Conceptual basis for the split between 'nature' and 'culture' (c) Philosophical theories about the environment: Utilitarianism: Deep Ecology: Ecofeminism. (d) Nonnhumans as recipients of moral consideration (e) Environment and Gender (f) Enviroment and Development (g) The Third World perspective (h) Revisioning Ethics, Metaphysics and Epistemology in the light of the above debates.

Course Number: HUL 289 | Credits: 4
Course Objective:

The course will begin by identifying various dimensions of human development and mapping the state of India and the world on these indicators. It will then discuss theories about how science and technology (S&T) have shaped human development historically and the dynamics of technological change. Relationship between innovation and human development will be discussed using examples from the appropriate technology movement, health, education, nutrition, energy, environment, and others. Gender dimensions of S&T, indigenous knowledge, and radical critiques of S&T will be discussed.

Course Number: HUL 371 | Credits: 3
Course Objective:

The course will begin with social theories on the production of technology and scientific knowledge systems, stratification within the community of technologists and scientists, discrimination (race, class, gender, caste) and the role of power in shaping the production of technology and scientific knowledge. Scientific controversies, both historical and emerging, and the organization of innovation and its geographies will be discussed. Case studies exploring ethical questions arising from new technologies such as information technology, nanotechnologies, biotechnologies, etc. will be used. Discussions on public understanding of science and role of the public and of experts in influencing policies related to science and technology will conclude the course.

Course Number: HUL 754 | Credits: 3
Course Objective:

An interdisciplinary exploration of the mutual interaction of science, technology and society, with insights drawn from sociology of sciences, history of science and technology, and the changing formations of the modern society.

Course Number: HUL 310 | Credits: 3
Course Objective:

The course will introduce students to selected topics in Policy Studies as decided by the instructor.

Course Number: HUL 286 | Credits: 4
Course Objective:

Distinction between 'growth‘ and 'development‘; historical genesis and evolution of the concept of development; theories of development and underdevelopment; the political nature of the development process. Role of state, market, culture and civil society in development. Gendered nature of development. Post-independence Indian experience (centralized planning and socialism) of development; selected comparisons with China, East Asia, South Asia, Africa, Latin America. Explaining India‘s slow progress in human and social development, poor record in reduction of poverty and inequality. Impact of globalization, foreign aid and economic reform on India‘s development. Experiments with decentralization and sustainable development.

Course Number: HUL 281 | Credits: 4
Course Objective:

The course will begin with theories and concepts on the use of technologies to improve governance such as efficiency, transparency, empowerment, economic gains, decentralization etc. It will discuss the concepts of democracy and governance, corruption and accountability. Examples and case studies from topics such as information and communication technologies for development, electronic governance, electronic voting, electronic databases (UID), web portals, community radio etc. Public-private partnerships, regulation of technology by the state, surveillance, and the role of stakeholders in the policy making process.