Sociology

Sociology

Sociology Faculty

Associate Professor
Professor
Assistant Professor
Assistant Professor
Associate Professor

Sociology Courses

Course Number: HUL 275 | Credits: 4
Course Objective:

Students will be exposed to contemporary themes and debates on connection between environment, development, and society; industrialization and risk society; challenge of sustainable development; perception of the environment, dependence for livelihood, identity, and power on natural resources; social ecology; what is the role of religion in determining our world view and relation with the environment?; recognition of indigenous knowledge; rise of environmental movements, development projects and recent conflict over natural resources; understanding major environmental disasters and industrial accidents; global climate change negotiations; gender and environment.

Course Number: HUL 845 | Credits: 3
Course Objective:

To acquaint the student with (a) philosophical concepts underlying thinking about the environmental crisis and (b) the models of human-nature relationship found in some of the classical philosophical systems of India. Contents: (a) What is 'environment'? (b) Conceptual basis for the split between 'nature' and 'culture' (c) Philosophical theories about the environment: Utilitarianism: Deep Ecology: Ecofeminism. (d) Nonnhumans as recipients of moral consideration (e) Environment and Gender (f) Enviroment and Development (g) The Third World perspective (h) Revisioning Ethics, Metaphysics and Epistemology in the light of the above debates.

Course Number: HUL 377 | Credits: 3
Course Objective:

The manner in which gender is conceptualized and performed is foundational to the understanding of human social relationships. Gender identities are not fixed or determined purely by physiology; their social construction affects ideas of masculinity and femininity or other sexual identities. Besides understanding how sex and gender are interrelated, we will look at how gender intertwines with societal areas of economy, technology, polity, religion and demography. The important role played by social structures and institutions such as caste, kinship, family, marriage, ethnicity, religion and class in structuring gender and vice- versa will be brought out. Technologies associated with population and biological sciences have transformed and are continuing to transform society and human relationships in particular directions. The course will examine these transformations at the global and local levels and consider their impact on individual lives. Challenges posed to intimate human relationships and identities by new reproductive technologies such as invitro-fertilization, surrogacy, sex selection will be explored. What does the emergence/ institutionalisation of new social forms - such as same sex marriages and parenthood by surrogacy - tell us about the possibilities and limits of human relationships?

Course Number: HUL 891 | Credits: 3
Course Objective:

Globalization & Globalism, Nationalism & Transnationalism, Dicopora, Glocality. Globalisation and Transnational movements of people, ideas & technology, culture, capital and goods. Relationship between locality, national boundaries and transnationalism- personal and collective identity. Transnational migration and global politics of gender and work in a global world- Dicopora. Religion and Ethnicity in a global world. The State and Democracy in a globalised world.

Course Number: HUL 760 | Credits: 3
Course Objective:

The basic aim of this course is to introduce students from various backgrounds scientists, technologists to the study and understanding of modern industrial societies. the course material will focus on the following topics. Nature and type of industrial society. Workers in modern industrial societies: the work situation; alienation; and embourgeoisement. White collar worker. Trade-unionisation. Industrial democracy. Labour management relations in Indian industries.

Course Number: HUL 378 | Credits: 3
Course Objective:

Globalization and Globality; Classical theories to understanding work and industry; Understanding Work, Work Ethic and Work Culture; Post-industrial society and rise of informational economy; Job-satisfaction and alienation; Equalization of Opportunities and the Flattening of the World; Outsourcing as a Business Strategy; Important changes in industry and rise of IT sector and BPO industry; Governance and Collective Organization of Workers in select sectors; Corporate Social Responsibility

Course Number: HUL 271 | Credits: 4
Course Objective:

The course will introduce students to the study of sociology and some basic underpinnings of sociological theory and methodology. The emergence of sociology as a scientific discipline is examined in the context of the development of Industrial society in Western Europe. The course will examine the writings of key classical social thinkers such as Marx, Durkheim and Weber as well as more contemporary theorists such as Michel Foucault, with a view to understanding various sociological approaches to modern industrial society.

Course Number: HUL 272 | Credits: 4
Course Objective:

This course will begin with a discussion on the various constructions of Indian society from colonial to contemporary times. The structural and cultural dimensions of Indian society are explored at the level of village, city, region, nation and civilization. Sources of differentiation, diversity and unity are explored through institutions such as caste, class and tribe; kinship, family, marriage and gender systems, religious traditions and political organisations. Transformations in these institutions are analysed and fault lines explored by studying contemporary issues of secularism, communalism, religious conversions, caste and identity movements. The sociological perspective remains key to interpreting changes in Indian society in the era of globalization and rapid economic change.

Course Number: HUL 706 | Credits: 3
Course Objective:

Psycho-linguistics and sociolinguistics; culture and identity studies; studies in expressive culture: idea-systems, myths and archtypes.

Course Number: HUL 376 | Credits: 3
Course Objective:

This course is an advanced undergraduate sociology course on the political ecology of water. It discusses people's historic and current engagement with water, sustainable development and water, the recent controversies and emergent resource conflict over water in the context of industrial development, design and implementation of hydropower projects, water pollution management, and conservation strategies (modern and traditional) and relates them to relevant national policies.

Course Number: HUL 371 | Credits: 3
Course Objective:

The course will begin with social theories on the production of technology and scientific knowledge systems, stratification within the community of technologists and scientists, discrimination (race, class, gender, caste) and the role of power in shaping the production of technology and scientific knowledge. Scientific controversies, both historical and emerging, and the organization of innovation and its geographies will be discussed. Case studies exploring ethical questions arising from new technologies such as information technology, nanotechnologies, biotechnologies, etc. will be used. Discussions on public understanding of science and role of the public and of experts in influencing policies related to science and technology will conclude the course.

Course Number: HUL 754 | Credits: 3
Course Objective:

An interdisciplinary exploration of the mutual interaction of science, technology and society, with insights drawn from sociology of sciences, history of science and technology, and the changing formations of the modern society.

Course Number: HUL 380 | Credits: 3
Course Objective:

The course will introduce students to selected topics in Sociology as decided by the instructor

Course Number: HUL 709 | Credits:
Course Objective:

Scientific approach to social research. Concepts and indices. Analytical and formal aspects. Hypothesis formulation and testing strategies. Design of applied empirical research. Measurement and interpretation of social data. Social statistics. Sampling designs, report writing.

Course Number: HUL 286 | Credits: 4
Course Objective:

Distinction between 'growth‘ and 'development‘; historical genesis and evolution of the concept of development; theories of development and underdevelopment; the political nature of the development process. Role of state, market, culture and civil society in development. Gendered nature of development. Post-independence Indian experience (centralized planning and socialism) of development; selected comparisons with China, East Asia, South Asia, Africa, Latin America. Explaining India‘s slow progress in human and social development, poor record in reduction of poverty and inequality. Impact of globalization, foreign aid and economic reform on India‘s development. Experiments with decentralization and sustainable development.

Course Number: HUL 701 | Credits: 3
Course Objective:

Classical Theories Positivism, evolutionism and Marxism, structuralism and functionalism in sociology and social anthropology. Exchange theory. Symbolic interactionism, conflict theory, neo-Marxism; post-modernism. The purpose of the course is two-fold: first, to introduce the student to the field of social theories; and second, to present him with some perspectives whereby he may develop a better understanding of both his social environment and theoretical understanding.

Course Number: HUL 761 | Credits: 3
Course Objective:

Approaches and Concepts: Institutions, Caste and Kinship; Religion; Marriage and Family. Agrarian social structure : Land reforms; Dimensions of social change; Sanskritisation and modernization. A profile of modern India.

Course Number: HUL 873 | Credits: 3
Course Objective:

The relationship between the sub-culture of science and the wider culture of knowledge which surrounds it. The nature of scientific knowledge and the general characteristics of scientific research which make such knowledge possible. Whether present framework of organizing knowledge is itself an object of sociological investigation? Comparison of methods of acquiring and of validating knowledge claims across cultures. Investigation through case studies of the various cognitive frameworks. Transfer of scientific and other expertise to wider sub-culture. Nature of scientific community, and of communication within a community and inter-community through networking.

Course Number: HUL 375 | Credits: 3
Course Objective:

This course will introduce students to sociological approaches to the study of religion in contemporary society. Religion will be understood in terms of its social and cultural structure; in addition the course will also encourage a critical perspective on religion and society – its interface with society, polity and the economy. Religious conflict and change, syncretism, popular religion, revivalism and fundamentalism will also be considered.

Course Number: HUL 759 | Credits: 3
Course Objective:

This course intends to impart a comprehensive and systematic understanding of urban social systems. Students completing this course will have a detailed knowledge of urban-growth and urban behaviour analysis, and urban- planning through a feedback analysis approach. Following will be the main course contents: Nature, types and growth of cities, Some important aspects of urban systems: migration; neighbourhood; social groups; and voluntary associations. Trend of urbanisation. Urban influences on rural areas. A profile of urban India and its problems. Solution of the problems through various approaches. Urban planning.

Course Number: HUL 766 | Credits: 3
Course Objective: